3 Things to Consider When Buying Generic

Wednesday, August 07 at 02:00 PM
Category: Personal Finance

Love them or hate them, generic brands have been around for decades and are here to stay. But they have come a long way since they made their entrance in the market thirty-plus years ago. Strolling around your local grocery store aisles today, you will see a wide variety of colorful packages and enticing names on products that appear to more closely compare with their name brand counterparts. With ever-growing options for groceries from fresh and frozen food to health and wellness products, it can be difficult to determine when it is worth it to buy generic. Below are some factors to consider to make the most of your money and effort when shopping.

Price

The appeal of generic brands is the cheaper price. Consumers often reach for the store brands to save money and meet their family’s needs, but it may not always be the least expensive option. Be sure to calculate the price per unit when comparing products even if the packages look the same. Some stores place the unit price on the label, but if they don’t, use a calculator. Divide the price of the item by the number of units in the package (i.e., ounce, cup, etc.). Also, check coupons and store circulars for savings on name brands and find stores that will double or triple those coupons or allow you to stack using manufacturer, store, and even online or app coupons and rebates. A little extra research may yield even greater savings.

Taste

Taste is ultimately a personal preference. A Consumer Reports taste test* found that store brands were equal or superior to name brands in many staple grocery categories and are an average of 15-30 percent lower in price. Check the ingredients and nutrition in generic or store brand items to see how they compare to the name brand item. If you are craving a unique flavor or if you have a particular loyalty to a brand, the name brand may be the better option. If the ingredients match and you don’t have a brand preference, go with the less expensive option. If you’re having trouble deciding between generic and name brand options, consider buying both and conducting your own taste test at home.

Quality

Historically, name brand products were perceived as higher-quality premium items compared to generic or store brands. Today, however, generic brands offer more premium items and more product choices than ever before. A recent survey* indicated that 75 percent of consumers perceive store brands as equal or better in quality compared to name brands. New generic products are available in “healthier” categories such as organic, plant-based, vegan and natural. Generic brands are required to meet the same standards as name brands and are tested by independent companies before they become available for purchase. So even if you’re trying to eat healthier, high-quality foods, generic brands might save you some money.

Which Products to Buy Generic

Below are a few staple grocery products* that are nearly always worth buying generic – they are typically as good or better than their name brand counterparts and usually cheaper.

  • Milk and Juice
  • Seasonings and spices
  • Frozen fruit and vegetables
  • Canned vegetables and beans
  • Baking and cooking supplies (baking mixes, flour, sugar, salt)
  • Snack foods (spreads and dips, dried fruit, pickles and olives, nuts and cookies)
  • Fresh produce
  • Cereal

When choosing between generic brands and the equivalent name brand products, consider price, taste and quality. Generic products are usually the cheapest, but it can save you even more to check coupons and specials on name brand items. Compare ingredients and nutrition and, if you can, sample multiple products to see which taste you prefer. A generic label doesn’t always indicate a lower quality and might even exceed the name brand. A little time and research might satisfy both your taste buds and your wallet.

Links marked with a * go to a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution.

Tags: Financial Education
 

How to Identify Student Loan Assistance Scams

Wednesday, August 07 at 02:00 PM
Category: Personal Finance

Arvest Bank is warning consumers about student loan assistance scams.

In these types of scams, borrowers receive phone calls, emails, letters, and/or texts offering them relief from their federal student loans or warning them that student loan forgiveness programs would end soon. Usually, the so-called student loan debt relief companies offering these types of services don’t offer any relief at all. Often they’re just fraudsters who are after your money.

Here are some signs to help you identify a scam by a student loan debt relief company:

  • They require you to pay up-front or monthly fees for help. It is illegal to charge an up-front fee for this type of service, so if a company requires a fee before they do anything, that’s a huge red flag—especially if they try to get your credit card number or bank account information. In some cases, they may even step in and ask you to pay them directly, promising to pay your servicer each month when your bill comes due. Free assistance is available through your federal loan servicer.
  • They promise immediate and total loan forgiveness or cancellation. No one can promise immediate and total loan forgiveness or cancellation. Most government forgiveness programs require many years of qualifying payments and/or employment in certain fields before your loans can be forgiven. Also, student loan debt relief companies do not have the ability to negotiate with your federal loan servicer for a “special deal” under the federal student loan programs. Payment levels under income-driven payment plans are set by federal law.
  • They ask for your Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID. The U.S Department of Education or its partners will never ask you for your FSA ID password. Your FSA ID is used to sign legally binding documents electronically. It has the same legal status as a written signature. Do not give your FSA ID password to anyone or allow anyone to create an FSA ID for you. If a company has access to your FSA ID information, they can make changes to your account without your permission.
  • They ask you to sign and submit a third-party authorization form or a power of attorney. These are written agreements giving the third party legal permission to talk directly to your federal loan servicer and make decisions on your behalf. Debt relief companies often want these authorizations so that they can change your account and contact information, so you don’t realize that they aren’t actually paying your monthly student loan bill.
  • They claim that their offer is limited and encourage you to act immediately. Student loan debt relief companies often try to instill a sense of urgency by citing “new laws” or discontinuing programs as a way to encourage borrowers to contact them immediately.
  • Their communications contain spelling and grammatical errors. While many of the communications sent out by these companies look very formal (for example, fold-and-tear letters with safety patterns), they often contain spelling and grammatical errors. If you notice unusual capitalization, improper grammar, or incomplete sentences in the communication you receive, that’s a red flag.

What should you do if you’ve already shared your information or paid one of these student loan debt relief companies? You need to complete the following tasks:

  • Log in to your Department of Education account and change your FSA ID. Do NOT share your new FSA ID password with anyone!
  • Contact your federal loan servicer to revoke any power of attorney or third-party authorization agreement that your servicer has on file. You should also make sure no unwanted actions were taken on your loans.
  • Contact your bank or credit card company, and request that payments to the company be stopped.
  • File a complaint with the FTC*.
  • File a report of suspicious activity through the Federal Student Aid Feedback System*.

 Links marked with * go to a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution.

 Source: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/avoiding-loan-scams

 

    

Tags: Financial Education
 

Auto Loans: Bigger Down Payment or Paying Off Other Debt?

Thursday, June 20 at 01:00 PM
Category: Personal Finance

When you take out a loan for a car, some people argue you should put down the biggest possible down payment, so your monthly payments are lower and you can pay it off quicker. Others advise prioritizing paying off other existing debts over making a big down payment. In reality, the solution that’s right for you depends on your financial situation.

You can get a low APR car loan with little or money down (with good credit). Use savings to pay off credit cards or other debt, not as a down payment. Buying a car, new or used, is a financial commitment. You can make a down payment, reducing the amount you’ll have to pay monthly on the vehicle. But what if you have more pressing debt, like credit card or student loan debt?

Does it make sense to sign up for a car payment plan and use the short-term cash to pay other debts first? We’ve analyzed the pros and cons of each choice. Read more here*.

 

*Link is a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution.

Tags: Financial Education
 

Small Business Banking Series in Greater Kansas City

Wednesday, May 08 at 01:00 PM
Category: Business Banking

So… What Do You Do? What’s Your 10-Second Commercial?

When meeting people for the first time, why do we struggle with explaining what we do in 10 seconds or less? Join our featured speaker, Dan Stalp of Sandler Training, for this highly interactive session where participants will:

  • Build intrigue when someone asks, “What do you do?”
  • Be more clear about the types of people/companies who qualify as good candidates for your business; and
  • Learn how to set strong verbal agreements with those who qualify for follow-up after meeting someone.

Dan Stalp has over 26 years of experience leading, training, and coaching high performing individuals. He has risked everything and completely started over twice career-wise, once in 1993 and again in 2005 by co-founding and founding his own firm. Dan has co-authored two books, “The Reunion” and “Antoerh Reunion,” about career significance and how pursuing what you were “meant to do” – along with always being grateful – plays an instrumental role in being the best you can be.

When not being mistaken for a certain Hollywood movie star, Dan and his wife Lisa of 28 years travel to Dallas, TX and Fayetteville, AR to visit their two grown daughters. Or they are attending rugby and lacrosse events for their high school and college aged sons.

This first session will be held Wednesday, May 29, 2019 from 11:30am to 1:00pm at the Regnier Center of Johnson County Community College (12345 College Blvd, Overland Park, KS – Room 270). This class is open to the public and registration includes lunch.

Space is limited. Registration is required. Please visit the event site* to reserve your spot today. 

Generously sponsored by Arvest Bank and hosted by the Kansas SBDC at JCCC, this workshop is the first of a 4-part Small Business Growth Lunch & Learn series*. The series will be an opportunity for small business owners and resource partners to network, share best practices, and learn from industry experts. Each session will feature a presenter on a different small business topic.

Links marked with * go to a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution.

 

*Participants do not need to attend all four sessions. 

Tags: Financial Education, Kansas City
 

Reminder: Before Using Your Credit Card for Online Purchases

Friday, March 22 at 12:00 AM
Category: Personal Finance

Making purchases online can be convenient and efficient. While online shopping never has a 100% guarantee, here are five simple tips that could help keep your information secure when entering your credit card online:

  1. Shop secure sites. Check for the ‘s’ behind the ‘http’ in a website’s address. The ‘s’ indicates the site is encrypted, which provides an extra layer of security for online buys. The address bar may also appear green, confirming the site is secure.
  2. Purchase at home or on a private wireless internet connection. Using either a public computer or a public Wi-Fi network can make you an easy target for nearby scammers.
  3. Keep your social private. Nearly all online purchases can be made without entering your social security number. Don’t provide this or any other unnecessary information when making a purchase.
  4. Add additional security. Anti-virus software and strong passwords may take a little time to set up, but keeping your personal information safe is worth the effort.
  5. Use your best judgement. If a site seems questionable, don’t follow through with the purchase. Deals that seem too good to be true could cost you in the long run if your credit card and other personal information falls into the wrong hands.

If you need assistance with your credit card or wish to report a potential issue, please contact us at (800) 356-8085.

    

Tags: Financial Education

Choose one or more categories to subscribe to:

Cancel